Hotels near the course location:

Best Western Plus City Centre Inn
11310-109th Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5G 2T7

Delta Hotels by Marriott Edmonton Centre Suites
10222 102 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4C5

Chateau Louis Hotel & Conference Centre
11727 Kingsway NW
Edmonton AB T5G 3A1

Edmonton Inn & Conference Centre
11834 Kingsway Ave
Edmonton, AB
T5G 3J5

Chateau Nova Kingsway
159 Airport Road
Edmonton, AB T5G 0W6

 

 

Deadline for application October 15 of each year
Date limite pour soumettre les demandes, le 15 octobre de chaque année


APPLICATION FORM ‐ FORMULAIRE DE DEMANDE DE BOURSE


Name of applicant / Nom du candidat:*
Address of applicant / Adresse du candidat:*
Member of CAPM&R / Membre de l'ACMP&R:*
Date of application / Date de la demande:*
Date funds will be used / Date d'utilisation de la bourse:*
Location of Visiting Professorship Program / Emplacement du programme de professeurs visiteurs*
Number of physiatrists / Nombre de physiatres*
Number of other physicians / Nombre de médecins non‐physiatres*
Number of residents & interns / Nombre de résidents & d'internes*
Number of medical students? / Nombre d'étudiants en médecine*
Other personnel? / Autre personnel?*
Describe the purpose of the program and its relevance to physiatry: Décrire le but du programme et son rapport à la physiatrie:*
Name of Visiting Professor / Nom du professeur visiteur:*
From / De quel endroit?*
Physiatrist? / Est‐il (elle) un(e) physiatre?*
Field of Expertise / Spécialité*
Summary of itinerary / Sommaire de l'itinéraire:*
Please include a copy of the program, if available. / Veuillez inclure une copie du programme si disponible.

PROPOSED BUDGET/ BUDGET PROPOSÉ


Travel & air fare / Transport*
Total per diem amount / Montant total per diem*
Honorarium / Honoraire*
Other (specify) / Autre (spécifier)
(Specify / Spécifier)
Total / Total*
Amount requested / Montant demandé*
Do you have other sources of funding for this event? / Avez‐vous d'autres sources de financement pour cet événement?*
If yes, please specify source and amount / Si oui, veuillez indiquer la provenance et le montant.
Additional comments / Autres commentaires:

DECLARATION/ DÉCLARATION

I hereby agree that if I am awarded a Visiting Professorship, I will submit a report to the Education Committee as required. I agree to abide by the decision of the committee. Type name below to sign.

Je, soussigné(e), accepte de soumettre un rapport d'évaluation au Comité de l'éducation si je reçois une bourse pour le programme de professeur visiteur. J'accepte de me conformer à la décision du comité. Tapez le nom ci-dessous pour signer.

Signature of applicant / Signature du candidat:*
Date:*

CAPM&R
4 Cataraqui Street, Suite 310
Kingston, ON K7K 1 Z7
Tel. / tél. : (613) 507‐0480
Fax / téléc. : (866) 531‐0626


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

Raza Awan

Dr. Raza Awan graduated from the University of Toronto’s faculty of medicine in 1995, and subsequently completed his residency training in physical medicine & rehabilitation at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota. After completing his residency training, Dr. Awan finished an additional fellowship year in sports medicine and clinical neurophysiology (EMG) at the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Awan is a diplomate of the Canadian society of clinical neurophysiologists, holds the Canadian academy of sports & exercise medicine diploma, and a Masters in health science from the University of Toronto. He has been working as a sports medicine physician and clinical neurophysiologist in Toronto since 2000.

He is currently the medical director and co-founder of Synergy Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation, a multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic in Toronto. Dr. Awan teaches medical students and residents, and is a lecturer at the University of Toronto. He treats athletes of all ability levels ranging from professional athletes to weekend warriors, and is a consultant for the NHL Player's Association. Dr. Awan programmed Synergy's rehabilitation model called "Movement Based Rehabilitation". He was amongst the first sports medicine doctors in Toronto to incorporate movement-based practitioners such as rehabilitative pilates/yoga instructors into his model; at Synergy he has fully integrated yoga and pilates studios into the clinic. He was also amongst the first in the city to utilize small-group exercise classes for musculoskeletal injury rehabilitation, and secondary prevention. Synergy currently runs a dozen rehabilitative exercise classes. Dr. Awan also created the Synergy “Keep your game on" series to educate athletes on injury prevention.

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 bakersteven

Dr. Steven Kent Baker

Dr. Baker obtained his undergraduate degree in Physical Education at Wilfrid Laurier University followed by a Bachelor of Education from the University of Western Ontario. He then studied skeletal muscle physiology at the University of Waterloo where he obtained his MSc degree in 1996. He completed undergraduate medical training at McMaster University in 2000 followed by a residency program in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation where he sub-specialized in neuromuscular disorders. He currently works in McMaster’s Neuromuscular/Neurometabolic Clinic coordinating the peripheral nerve service. His areas of interest include acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies and toxic myopathies. He currently holds the Hamilton Hospital Assessment Centre Endowed Chair in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation and is the Research Director for the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

 

Dr. Sukhi Bhangu

Dr. Bhangu completed her medical school training at the University of Manitoba. She completed her residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Toronto. Dr. Bhangu is board certified in Physiatry in Canada and the U.S., and is EMG certified through the Canadian Society of Clinical Neurophysiologists. Her primary interests and practice are focused on general musculoskeletal conditions and electromyography. Her practice is primarily community based. She also enjoys teaching students and residents.

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Neil Binkley, M.D.

Dr. Neil Binkley earned his medical degree from the University of Wisconsin Medical School (Madison, WI, USA) and subsequently received his training in Internal Medicine at the Marshfield Clinic. After several years in private practice, he returned to the University of Wisconsin and completed a Geriatrics fellowship. He is a Professor in the Divisions of Geriatrics and Endocrinology at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He is also Director of the UW Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program and Associate Director of the UW Institute on Aging. He is past President of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and a member of the International Osteoporosis Foundation Committee of Scientific Advisors. His current research involves evaluation of approaches to optimize assessment of vitamin D status, exploring racial/ethnic differences in response to vitamin D supplementation, evaluation of functional assessment in older adults and the importance of sarcopenia in fracture risk.

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Tharshini Chandra

Ms. Chandra is the Clinical Coordinator of the Hull-Ellis Clinic. She has a Bachelor’s of Science degree (Neuroscience) from the University of Toronto. She has worked as a psychometrist in clinical practice and research for 22 years, working principally with patients with acquired brain injuries. Tharshini has been instrumental in developing the Hull-Ellis Clinic and is responsible for all of the day to day clinic activities as well as ensuring data collection and data quality is of the highest standard.

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Paul Comper

Dr. Paul Comper is a clinical neuropsychologist and research scientist.Paul and Medical Director Dr. Mark Bayley are the Co-Principal Investigators for the Hull-Ellis Clinic at Toronto Rehab.In addition to his work at Toronto Rehab, Paul is a faculty member at the University of Toronto where he teaches and supervises graduate students in the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education and the Graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science at U of T Scarborough. He has been the consultant neuropsychologist to the MacIntosh Sports Medicine Clinic at U of T since 1999.

Since 2002 Paul has been the consultant neuropsychologist to the National Hockey League Players’ Association and he is currently the co-chair of the joint NHL/PA Concussion Subcommittee. Dr. Comper has presented nationally and internationally on the topic of mild traumatic brain injury and sports concussions. He is the author of numerous peer- reviewed publications and most recently is the author of an Oxford Press book chapter entitled “Concussion and the College Athlete”.

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Sue Dojeiji, MD, MEd, FRCPC

Dr. Sue Dojeiji obtained her medical degree from the University of Western Ontario in 1993. She completed residency training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa in 1998, and a Masters of Education (Health Professions) from OISE/University of Toronto in 2000.  She successful completed the Canadian Society of Clinical Neurophysiologists Electromyography exam.

Dr Dojeiji practices in Electrodiagnostic Medicine and Neuromuscular Rehabilitation at the Ottawa Hospital Rehabilitation Centre.

Dr. Dojeiji was a Maintenance of Certification accreditor with the University of Ottawa Continuing Medical Education Office, University of Ottawa PM&R Program Director (2004 – 2009) and PM&R Chief and Chair (2009 – 2015).  She was chair of the RCPSC PM&R Fellowship Examination Committee (2010 – 2016).

She is a RCPSC Clinician-Educator supporting the work of the CanMEDS Education and Competence By Design (CBD) offices.  She’s collaborated on several CanMEDS-related publications and learning tools.  Her current work entails facilitation of CBD workshops with several specialty committees in preparation for CBD implementation.

As a Clinician-Educator, Dr. Dojeiji’s scholarship focus includes developing, implementing and evaluating verbal, written and team-based communication skills programs.  She has developed elearning modules related to creating effective consultation letters and leading family conferences.  Her most recent scholarship project validated a communication and collaboration tool for family conferences.

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Rosa Dragonetti, MSc, RP

Rosa Dragonetti, MSc, RP is the Project Director of Addictions Research and Education at CAMH. Rosa plays a key role in developing a strategy for education research and programming initiatives including the TEACH project. Some of the other projects she is involved with include the STOP Program, PREGNETS, Canadaptt and various other tobacco-related projects. She has been a MINT Trainer (Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers) since 2009 and had delivered numerous workshops and training on basic and advanced motivational interviewing skills. Rosa was trained as an Addiction Therapist and continues her clinical work offering CBT and motivational interviewing to clients who struggle with depression, anxiety and substance use.

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Dr. Nancy Dudek

Dr. Nancy Dudek is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. She received her MD from The University of Western Ontario in 1999. She became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 2004 in the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. In 2005 she completed a Master of Education program at the University of Toronto.

She has a diverse clinical practice and works at The Rehabilitation Centre, the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre and the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. She focuses on Amputee Rehabilitation, Prosthetics and Orthotics. Dr. Dudek’s academic interests are in Medical Education. Her focus is the assessment of medical students and residents with a particular interest in work based assessment. She holds several grants related to research in this area. Dr. Dudek has served as the University of Ottawa’s undergraduate coordinator for Musculoskeletal Medicine and as the Director for the Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Residency Program. She is the recipient of an Ottawa Hospital Compass Award, the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada Young Educators Award and the Dr. Meridith Marks Educator Award for Innovation & Scholarship in Medical Education. She currently works as a Clinician Educator for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

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Michael Gofeld, MD, FRCPC, DEAA, FIPP, CIPS

Current appointment:

Associate Professor, University of Toronto and McMaster University

Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada

Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, McMaster University

Professional Societies:

Immediate Past-President: World Academy of Pain Medicine Ultrasonography

Vise-Chair (Ultrasound), Board of Examination, World Institute of Pain

Creative Professional Activity:

Chair, Chronic Pain Registry Committee, Advisory Board, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care

Peer-Reviewed Journals

Section Editor: Current Headache and Pain Reports (Neuromodulation), Pain Practice (Imaging)

Associate Editor: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

Peer-Review Publications: 41 Book Chapters: 39

Experience:

Clinical: Neuromodulation, musculoskeletal and neurological diagnostic and procedural ultrasonography, radiofrequency, vertebral augmentation, spinal injections, regenerative medicine, managing complex cancer and non-cancer pain, advanced imaging (high-frequency ultrasound, CT, navigation)

Education: medical student curriculum, chronic pain fellowship, CME courses

Research: preclinical and clinical interventional pain studies including multicenter trials, patient-oriented research.

Administration: Chronic pain clinic protocols, design and maintenance of triage and clinic database, quality improvement projects 

Research Interests:

Mechanisms of neuromodulation, novel image-guided approaches, joint innervation, chronic pain outcomes

Clinical interests:

Non-surgical treatment of osteoarthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions, nerve injuries, sport injuries, facial pain and headaches, regenerative medicine  

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Brian C. Liem, MD, FAAPMR

Brian C. Liem, MD, FAAPMR is a board certified attending physiatrist and sports medicine physician at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle. He earned his medical degree at NYU School of Medicine and completed his residency at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (now Shirley Ryan AbilityLab). He completed his fellowship in sports medicine at the University of Washington. He serves as the director of UW residency Clinical Musculoskeletal (MSK) Course and MSK Ultrasound Course and is on the sports medicine fellowship committee. Other responsibilities include being a section editor of Current PMR Reports. He also is the team physician for Ballard High School in Seattle, WA. Dr. Liem is a member of AAPMR, AMSSM, ACSM.

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Dr. Alex Lo

Dr. Alex Lo is a physiatrist specializing in Stroke and Acquired Brain Injury rehabilitation at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. He is a Clinician-Teacher and Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, and is cross-appointed to the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. He has a Masters in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety from the University of Toronto, and his academic focus is on curriculum and faculty development, teaching and project mentorship in quality improvement.

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Dr Thomas A Miller, MD FRCPC

Dr. Miller is a graduate of Queen’s University (MD, 1989), in Kingston Canada. He subsequently trained in physical medicine & rehabilitation ( U of Ottawa) and a fellowship in clinical neurophysiology (Sydney, Australia UNSW). Tom is an associate professor in the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at Western University (London, Canada) in the department of PM&R. He is the medical director of the neuromusculoskeletal rehabilitation program at Parkwood Hospital, Director of the Electrodiagnostic laboratory, consultant physiatrist with the Hand and Upper Limb Centre, and co-director of the Peripheral Nerve Clinic at St. Josephs Health Care, London. The PNC program was one of the first to offer an multidisciplinary assessment and treatment (surgical & rehabilitation) for major nerve injuries in Canada. Dr. Thomas A. Miller, is a past President of the Canadian Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (CAPMR) and the current Chair of the Canadian Physiatrists Research and Development Foundation (CPRDF).

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Dr. Nimish Mittal

Dr. Nimish Mittal is currently a clinical fellow in interventional pain and electromyography at the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto. He completed his medical school and specialty training in physical medicine and rehabilitation from India. Subsequently, he worked in an academic role in India for several years and travelled extensively in US as part of an academic visitor program. His expertise involves comprehensive multimodal pain management including USG and fluoroscopy guided interventions. Dr Mittal is passionate about finding pain solutions beyond boundaries and limitations.

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Kristin Musselman, PT, PhD

Dr. Kristin Musselman is a Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute – University Health Network and an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Physical Therapy at the University of Toronto. Previously she was a CIHR Post-doctoral Fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Kennedy Krieger Institute from 2010-2013. One focus of her laboratory is the prevention of falls and rehabilitation of walking and balance following a spinal cord injury.

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Colleen O’Connell, MD, FRCPC

Colleen completed medical school at Memorial University of Newfoundland and residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Dalhousie University. She specializes in neuro-rehabilitation, and is Research Chief at New Brunswick’s Stan Cassidy Centre for Rehabilitation. She holds appointments at Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine and the University Of New Brunswick Faculty Of Kinesiology. She is a clinician researcher with the Canadian ALS Research Network, The Rick Hansen Institute Research Network, The Canadian Neurologic Diseases Network, The Canadian Neuropulmonary Consortium, and the Atlantic Mobility Action Project. Research foci include treatments and applied technologies for mobility impairment in neurologic injury and disease, treatments in neurologic diseases including ALS and MS, and development of best practice recommendations. She is a member of Heart and Stroke’s Best Practices Advisory Committee and an author of the Managing Stroke Transitions in Care Best Practice Recommendations and the Canadian Home Mechanical Ventilation Clinical Practice Guidelines.

In addition to her clinical and research practice, Colleen has over 25 years of global health experience. Colleen is founder and chair of Team Canada Healing Hands, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing rehabilitation care and training in developing countries. She has had opportunity to work in areas of care delivery, training, and research in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia. She is a member of the Disaster Committee of the International Spinal Cord Society and represents Canada with the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. She has co-authored numerous publications on and provided technical guidance to the World Health Organization on rehabilitation in the humanitarian field.

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Mark Ratto

Dr. Matt Ratto is Chief Science Officer at Nia Technologies, an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, and directs the Semaphore Research Cluster on Inclusive Design, Mobile and Pervasive Computing. Matt is an avowed expert on 3D printing and digital fabrication, having carried out research on this topic since 2009. His work explores the intersections between digital technologies and the human life world, with a particular focus on new developments that trouble the divide between online and offline modes of production. His current research is funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Ministry for Innovation, the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, CBM Canada, Autodesk Foundation, and Google Foundation.

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Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS, FAAMA

Narda G. Robinson, DO, DVM, MS, FAAMA teaches both human and veterinary healthcare providers through her company, CuraCore Integrative Medicine & Education Center. CuraCore courses emphasize the need for a scientific approach to integrative medicine, through courses that include medical acupuncture, massage, botanical medicine, and photomedicine. In addition, Dr. Robinson also served on the faculty of the Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Fort Collins, Colorado for nearly 20 years, teaching, researching, and practicing integrative therapies.

Dr. Robinson holds a Bachelor of Arts (AB) degree from Harvard/Radcliffe, a doctorate in osteopathic medicine (DO) from the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, a doctorate in veterinary medicine (DVM), and a master’s degree (MS) in biomedical sciences from the Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She attained the status of Fellow through the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture and serves on the American Board of Medical Acupuncture, for which she heads the examination committee for board certification in medical acupuncture.

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Dr. Nabila Soomro, MBBS, FCPS

Dr. Nabila Soomro is the first tenured professor of PM&R in Pakistan and the first lady to achieve this milestone. She is currently the director of the Institute of PM&R at DOW University of health sciences, Karachi. IPM&R is the only PM&R institute dedicated to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation in the civil sector in Pakistan. She is a dynamic person with a passion to further strengthen and develop PM&R in the public and private sector of Pakistan.

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Rebecca Titman

Rebecca Titman is a 3rd year PM&R resident at the University of Toronto and the assistant Chief Resident of the program.

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Ricardo Viana

Dr. Ricardo Viana is an assistant professor at Western University. His inpatient clinical focus is shared between stroke and amputee rehabilitation while his outpatient clinics also include EMG and chronic pain management including ultrasound guided interventions. He also spends much of his time focused on undergraduate and postgraduate medical education working on curriculum design, feedback and clinical assessment.

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REGISTER ON OR BEFORE DECEMBER 31, 2017 & SAVE $100!

Click here to Register Online 

Early Registration On or Before
December 31, 2017

Regular Registration Begins
January 1, 2018
Registration Ends
March 1, 2018

 

Join us in the 10th Comprehensive Review Course of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Edmonton, AB. The course will cover basic sciences and laboratory sessions correlated with clinical skills as well as a review of MSK anatomy and neuroanatomy. In addition to discussing major areas in PM&R, topics such as driving, wheelchairs and specialized seating, feeding and swallowing, etc. will also be reviewed. Interactive discussions on medical ethics and research methodology will complement the conference.

A review exam is planned for the last day of the course and will include written and OSCE station components. Registration for the exam is limited. This course is offered every second year with the location altering between Western and Eastern Canada.

INTENDED AUDIENCE
The Review Course is open to residents and practicing Physiatrists. Priority will be given to PGY4 and PGY5 residents.

Click here to Register Online

  • EXAM FEE - $200
  • RESIDENTS
    • Resident Early - $1,000
    • Resident Late - $1,100
    • Resident Daily Rate - $200
  • PHYSIATRISTS
    • Physiatrist Early - $1,500
    • Physiatrist Late - $1,600
    • Physiatrist Daily Rate - $300

Registration Entitlements - Resident and Physiatrist: Registration fees include course tuition, program materials as well as light refreshments for morning and afternoon breaks.

Cancellation Policy: The CAPM&R reserves the right to limit registration and to cancel the course no less than one week prior to the scheduled date should circumstances make this necessary.

Should this unlikely event happen, the tuition would be refunded in full. Cancellation of registration must be received in writing at the CAPM&R Secretariat by February 1, 2018 for registration fees to be refunded. A processing fee of $50 will be charged on all refunds. No refunds will be issued after February 1, 2018.

Dysmobility Syndrome: The Future of Fracture Risk Reduction

Dr. Neil Binkley, Professor of Medicine, Divisions of Geriatrics and Endocrinology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Current approaches to "osteoporosis" treatment are inadequate. It is essential to recognize that low bone mass, i.e., osteoporosis, is only part of a syndrome complex that leads to falls and fragility fractures. Thus, the field needs to move "beyond the bone." Potential considerations in the dysmobility concept include sarcopenia, obesity, diabetes and osteoarthritis among others. It is anticipated that bringing forward the concept of dysmobility will facilitate moving our fracture risk reduction efforts to a focus upon the individual, rather than on their bones. This session will be of value to physiatrists, medical students and residents.

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Roles and guidance for rehabilitation efforts in the humanitarian field

Colleen O'Connell, Research Chief, Stan Cassidy Centre for Rehabilitation and Nabila Soomro, Director, Institute of PM&R, DOW University of Health Sciences, Karachi

Current manufacturing techniques to produce prosthetics and orthotics require extensive manual labor and is time consuming. These factors limit the capacity of prosthetists and orthotists to provide patient care, particularly in resource-limited settings. The use of a digital tool-chain, including 3D scanning of patient residual limbs, computer design of appropriate topologies, and 3D printing of devices potentially reduces the manufacturing time thereby increasing clinical capacities. In partnership with CoRSU Hospital, Uganda, CSPO, Cambodia and CCBRT/Tatcot, Tanzania, non-profit Nia Technologies has carried out a large-scale clinical trial comparing current ICRC methods with 3DPrintability, a software and hardware toolchain it has developed. This toolchain will be explained and initial analysis of results from the trial will be discussed. Preliminary results indicate that 3DPrintAbility devices are performing to the same level of efficacy as traditionally manufactured prosthetics. Current data supports the hypothesis that a digital manufacturing tool-chain is a viable alternative to current methods and may be desirable given the time savings involved. Capabilities and continuing challenges will be explored.

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Post-Stroke Shoulder Pain

Dr. Ricardo Viana

The presentation will endeavour to define post-stroke shoulder pain and provide an approach to help the clinician to identify the most likely etiology of pain. Next I will look at the most common etiologies and explore the evidence based management options in greater detail, including possible oportunities for interventional managment. Target audience: Physiatrists, residents and medical students. Also may be helpful for therapists.

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The World of 3D printing – what it means for you and your patients today

Dr. Matt Ratto, Chief Science Officer, Nia Technologies & Associtate Professor, University of Toronto Faculty of Information

Current manufacturing techniques to produce prosthetics and orthotics require extensive manual labor and is time consuming. These factors limit the capacity of prosthetists and orthotists to provide patient care, particularly in resource-limited settings. The use of a digital tool-chain, including 3D scanning of patient residual limbs, computer design of appropriate topologies, and 3D printing of devices potentially reduces the manufacturing time thereby increasing clinical capacities. In partnership with CoRSU Hospital, Uganda, CSPO, Cambodia and CCBRT/Tatcot, Tanzania, non-profit Nia Technologies has carried out a large-scale clinical trial comparing current ICRC methods with 3DPrintability, a software and hardware toolchain it has developed. This toolchain will be explained and initial analysis of results from the trial will be discussed. Preliminary results indicate that 3DPrintAbility devices are performing to the same level of efficacy as traditionally manufactured prosthetics. Current data supports the hypothesis that a digital manufacturing tool-chain is a viable alternative to current methods and may be desirable given the time savings involved. Capabilities and continuing challenges will be explored.

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Feedback -Saying what you mean without being mean

Nancy Dudek, Associate Professor, University of Ottawa

Useful, timely information on performance (feedback) promotes learning and changes in behavior. Providing this feedback has been a challenge for postgraduate medical education. Residents say they want more but sometimes there are concerns noted with how they receive it. Supervisors identify numerous barriers to providing useful feedback in the busy clinical environments in which they work. As residency programs move towards a CBME curriculum the ability to provide feedback and implement the feedback has become even more relevant.

Feedback does not only exist within our educational context. The ability to provide useful feedback to other healthcare professionals, patients and peers is a key component of successful clinical work. Consideration of feedback skills necessary for success in these contexts will also be discussed.

This session will be of value to : Physiatrists, Medical Students and Residents.

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A Brief Overview of Motivational Interviewing

Rosa Dragonetti, Project Director, Addictions Education and Research, CAMH

This session will be of value to any healthcare provider and will describe an evidence-based method of communication that will help you increase your client's motivation to change any behavior.

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Vitamin D:  The Panacea and the Controversies

Dr. Neil Binkley, Professor of Medicine, Divisions of Geriatrics and Endocrinology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This session will be of value to physiatrists, trainess and other healthcare providers. We will review the controversy and chaos surrounding the definition of vitamin D "inadequacy" and the potential importance of achieving optimal vitamin D status. Recognize the challenges surrounding measurement of 25(OH)D, the necessity of utilizing standardized 25(OH)D assays and the futility of attempting to perform meta-analyses using non-standardized 25(OH)D measurement. Subsequently a clinical approach to vitamin D status based upon highly sun exposed individuals and appreciating assay variability will be discussed.

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Dysmobility Syndrome

Dr. Neil Binkley, Professor of Medicine, Divisions of Geriatrics and Endocrinology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Fragility fractures engender major healthcare cost, reduce independence/quality and life and increase mortality risk. Despite availability of multiple therapies to reduce risk for future fracture, few patients are treated even following hip fracture. Clearly, approaches of the past aimed at reducing fragility fracture risk, primarily by diagnosing osteoporosis and initiating bone-active medications, have failed. A different approach is required; such a change in focus is proposed. Briefly, the dysmobility syndrome concept recognizes fragility fracture as the clinical outcome of consequence and appreciates that osteoporosis is only part of the syndrome leading to “osteoporosis-related” fracture. Other components of this syndrome include sarcopenia, obesity, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and potentially multiple other factors that increase risk for falls with attendant increased fracture risk. In summary, the dysmobility syndrome concept moves the field, and also importantly, older adults at risk for fragility fracture, beyond a singular focus on bone to more appropriately focus on an overall approach to fracture risk reduction. This session will be of value to physiatrists, other healthcare providers and medical trainees.

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Physiatry Update - Orthotics

Nancy Dudek, Associate Professor, University of Ottawa

Innovative designs, materials and components can improve the function, ease of use and comfort of orthoses resulting in better outcomes for our patients. This session will focus on these issues with a focus on ankle foot orthoses and knee orthoses.

The session will be of value to: Physiatrists, Medical Students and Residents.

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Pain Overview and Pain in the Butt

Brian C. Liem, MD, FAAPMR

The presentation will provide an overview of the common sources of buttock pain and discuss current evidence behind management strategies for select conditions.

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Scientific Basis of Acupuncture

Narda G. Robinson, President and CEO, CuraCore Integrative Medicine & Education Center

In this presentation, Dr. Narda Robinson will present the scientific basis of acupuncture, especially as it pertains to four areas of focus in physiatry (i.e., areas identified as "key issues" by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation). These conditions include pain control, stroke rehabilitation, spine problems, and traumatic brain injury. Dr. Robinson will teach about the effects of acupuncture on central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system pathways as well as its impact on connective tissue structures. She will also discuss research evidence that shows how acupuncture could benefit patients in a PM&R practice.

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Platelet Rich Plasma in Musculoskeletal Pain: Is it the New Future??

Nimish Mittal, Clinical Fellow,Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University of Toronto

At the end of presentation, the participant are expected to develop a better understanding of the framework of platelet rich plasma nomenclature, mechanism of action, therapeutic potential and utility in various musculoskeletal conditions. The participants may be able to counsel the patients and help make an informed decision about the success of these treatments on the basis of available current medical literature and evidence.

The session will be of value to "Physiatrists, Fellows, Residents, Medical Students."

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3D printing lower-limb prosthetics and orthotics: insights from clinical trials in Uganda, Tanzania, and Cambodia.

Matt Ratto, Chief Science Officer, Nia Technologies

Current manufacturing techniques to produce prosthetics and orthotics require extensive manual labor and is time consuming. These factors limit the capacity of prosthetists and orthotists to provide patient care, particularly in resource- limited settings. The use of a digital tool-chain, including 3D scanning of patient residual limbs, computer design of appropriate topologies, and 3D printing of devices potentially reduces the manufacturing time thereby increasing clinical capacities. In partnership with CoRSU Hospital, Uganda, CSPO, Cambodia and CCBRT/Tatcot, Tanzania, non-profit Nia Technologies has carried out a large-scale clinical trial comparing current ICRC methods with 3DPrintability, a software and hardware toolchain it has developed. This toolchain will be explained and initial analysis of results from the trial will be discussed. Preliminary results indicate that 3DPrintAbility devices are performing to the same level of efficacy as traditionally manufactured prosthetics. Current data supports the hypothesis that a digital manufacturing tool- chain is a viable alternative to current methods and may be desirable given the time savings involved. Capabilities and continuing challenges will be explored.

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Pelvic dysfunction: The Missing Link

Raza Awan, Medical Director, Synergy Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation

Pelvic pain is a common presenting complaint to physiatrists, and is a challenging clinical syndrome to diagnose and treat. Patients with pelvic pain may present with additional co-morbidities such as urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. Many patients encountered in physiatric practice with non-resolving low back and/or hip pain, may also have underlying occult pelvic muscle dysfunction.  This entity is often under-recognized and if untreated may lead to poor rehabilitation outcomes. This presentation will outline risk factors for underlying pelvic muscle dysfunction in patients with non-resolving low back and/or hip pain, and discuss when it is appropriate to refer a patient to see a pelvic physiotherapist.

This session will be of value to: Physiatrists, Physiotherapists, Gynecologists, Urologists, Midwives, Residents, Medical Students, or any clinicians who treat pelvic pain in their practice.

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Osseointegration in Canada - Dream or reality?

Natalie Habra, Physiatrist, Medical chief of amputee program, Montreal Gingras-Lindsay Rehabilitation Institute

Osseointegration is presently not available in Canada. However, a growing number of Canadian amputee patients are getting the surgery abroad and returning to Canada for their rehabilitation and follow-up.

This SIG will be a forum for discussion amongst Canadian physiatrists concerning osseointegration in Canada. We will review the OI cases in Canada. We will then discuss a standardized assessment protocol, patient registry and implantation of this novel technique in Canada.

The session will be of value to Physiatrists, and less so for residents and medical students.

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Bedside Falls Assessment

Kristin Musselman, Scientist and Assistant Professor, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network and University of Toronto

In this session a comprehensive approach to the assessment of fall risk will be presented. The BBSE (Biological, Behavorial, Social and Economic, Environmental) Model of Fall Risk and the Systems Framework of Postural Control will be reviewed and integrated to guide a comprehensive bedside assessment. The importance of reactive balance control for fall prevention will be discussed, and methods to assess this component of postural control will be demonstrated.

This session will be of value to: Physiatrists, Medical Students, Residents.

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Development of a Best Practice Model in Acute Concussion Care: The Hull-Ellis Concussion and Research Clinic at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - Preliminary Findings

Paul Comper, Principal Co-Investigator, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - UHN and Tharshini Chandra, Clinical Coordinator, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - UHN

Research in the area of Sport Related Concussion has yielded a wealth of translational research data over the past 10 to 20 years. However, there is a lack of research relevant to patients with acute concussion who are not athletes. The Hull-Ellis Concussion Care and Research Clinic at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute was designed from the outset to prospectively characterize and understand a multitude of factors associated with concussion, including but not limited to: mechanism of injury (MOI), symptoms at first visit, the ‘normal’ recovery trajectory, gender differences, modifiers of recovery, neurocognitive and psychological dysfunction and recovery, balance impairment, etc., while simultaneously providing routine medical care, monitoring and follow-up among the general population who present to 3 clinic-partnered ERs.

Patients/study participants diagnosed with concussion from 3 ERs in downtown Toronto meeting specific inclusion criteria (e.g., GCS=15; 17-85 years, not admitted to hospital, no positive imaging findings) are referred to the Hull Ellis Clinic via a standardized referral form from 3 partnered ERs. Each patient is contacted by the Clinic Coordinator within 72 hours, with admission to the clinic within one week of referral. Comprehensive multifactorial NIH common data elements are collected at the first visit. Patients are then offered an opportunity to participate in a prospective research REB-approved study, where data on multiple variables are collected at 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Data elements specific to cognitive functioning, balance, psychosocial variables, symptoms, physician related assessments and date of discharge are captured. During the data collection sequence, each patient also receives treatment by a physician, including medical assessment, education, symptom management support, routine monitoring and regular follow-up. Participants who remain symptomatic beyond 16 weeks are offered further treatment outside of the research paradigm.

In this presentation we will discuss development of the H-E from conception to gaining REB approval, then to practical implementation. Preliminary data with respect to demographics, cognition, balance and postural control, characteristics of patients with delayed recovery will be discussed. This session will be of value to physiatrists, medical students and residents.

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Resident Town Hall: A Primer on contract negotiations and job search strategies

Rebecca Titman, Resident, University of Toronto

This session will include a short talk on contract negotiations that will highlight important considerations when signing on the dotted line for your first job as a staff physician. We will also have a panel discussion with four recent graduates to answer any resident questions on finding that job in the first place. This session will be of value to residents at any level of training.

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Spinal Cord Injury Special Interest Group

Colleen O'Connell, Research Chief, Stan Cassidy Centre for Rehabilitation

Networking is invaluable for generation of ideas, fostering collaborations and validating current practice approaches. In this spirit,  SCI physiatrists will share and discuss current activities in clinical innovations and research.  Respiratory care of persons with SCI is an area that the SCI eScan and the Rick Hansen Institute SCI Registry have identified as having significant gaps in resources across the country. With a trained facilitator, we will conduct a focus group session on understanding current practices related to monitoring cough effectiveness and use of airway clearance strategies for individuals with neuromuscular disease and spinal cord injuries, as well as existing barriers, recommendations and potential strategies to mitigate these barriers. The results of this focus group will be utilized in a formal study on airway clearance strategies, and participants will be asked to consent to participate.

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